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Both the numbers of COVID-19 infections and deaths from the virus in rural areas are increasing at rates that match or exceed those in the nation’s cities.

The number of deaths and coronavirus cases in rural America are far fewer than in the cities. Over the past few days, however, cities and rural counties have been increasing at about the same rate, according to data compiled by USA Facts

For example, in the last day, the central counties in the metros of a million people or more reported 159 deaths attributed to COVID-19, an increase of 13.1 percent.

All non-metropolitan counties reported 19 deaths from the coronavirus, a 20 percent increase from the day before. As of the end of Monday, 95 people in rural counties have died from the virus.

From March 26 through March 30, deaths from COVID-19 increased 128 percent nationally.

In rural counties during that period, deaths increased by 217 percent, from 30 deaths by March 26 to a cumulative total of 95 deaths by the end of March 30.

The map ABOVE shows the urban and rural counties that have reported deaths from COVID-19 as of the end of Monday. 

Rural counties that have reported deaths are  . Rural counties without deaths are .

Click on the map and you can find information about your county, including both the number of total deaths and total cases of COVID-19 as of Monday.

The number of COVID-19 cases in rural counties is also increasing at a rate well above the national average. From March 26 through March 30, the number of COVID-19 cases nationally increased by 90 percent. In rural counties, however, the number of COVID-19 cases in rural counties jumped by 103 percent during this same period.

Monroe County, Pennsylvania, is the rural county reporting the most deaths from COVID-19, with seven fatalities due to the virus. Eagle County, Colorado, reported four deaths. St. James Parish, Louisiana, reported three deaths.