A Liberty County, Texas, sheriff's vehicle clears the way for a herd of cattle moving through the business district of Dayton, Texas, a city of about 7,200 residents northeast of Houston. This is a screen capture from a video posted on Twitter by @houstonbch (link below). "Where are you taking them," asks a woman off camera. "Higher ground," a man's voice responds. The cattle are moving west, away from the Trinity River, which bisects Liberty County.

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A man referred to as Rowdy releases a corralled horse to take it to safety while his father takes video from horseback nearby.

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An Austin television station shows flooding in La Grange, Texas, which is about 100 miles west of Houston. Residents there pitched in to help some businesses evacuate before the waters rose.

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The Fayette County, Texas, Office of Emergency Management released this aerial video showing flooding along the Colorado River. The river wraps around three sides of La Grange, a city of about 4,500 residents.

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Cattle weren’t the only critters that struggled to get out of the path of the flooding. @HeggieCoulter from Orange County, Texas, about 100 miles east of Houston, snapped this photo. Besides an errant alligator, @cdenisegayle collected posts featuring a bat, a snake, a hog, and a floating colony of fire ants.

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By the time this video was posted, Hurricane Harvey had already been downgraded to a tropical storm. This was shot on the Bolivar Peninsula, one of the barriers that create Galveston Bay.

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A rancher moving cattle to higher ground through Dayton, Texas, gets a law-enforcement escort.

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Some cotton farmers were stuck with their harvested crop sitting in the field. The bales (left) are designed to shed rain. But the bales on the right dissolved after sitting in flood water.

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In case you didn’t know …

A map of flooding a road closures in and around Houston. Dark blue is a road closure, light blue is flooding.